Residential property management firms will sometimes see and deal with tenants who are dissatisfied with the way their landlords conduct business. It’s an unfortunately common experience, as far too many property owners are willing to collect their rent but fail to uphold their end of the business arrangement they’ve made. As a result, landlords can be sued by their tenants.

This is something that is entirely avoidable. This is also something that many landlords don’t have funds to set aside for – legal fees associated with tenants suing. Here are some things that you can do to avoid having disgruntled tenants trying to take you on legally.

Keep Up on Repairs and Maintenance

This is easily the most common reason behind tenants suing their landlords. If a home starts to fall into disrepair, or existing damages or other problems have not been addressed by the landlord, tenants get antsy very quickly. It’s not hard to see why – some issues can make a space uninhabitable, unhygienic and unsafe.

Additionally, failing to keep a property maintained can violate local laws. If you live in an area where such laws apply, you need to keep up to date on what these laws are, and any changes made to the laws over time. If you violate the law, litigation could be on the horizon.

Make Sure the Home is Up to Safety Standards

An unsafe home is another complaint that residential property management professionals hear far too frequently. Landlords are responsible for ensuring their tenants’ safety before the lease is even signed. Make sure that the home’s wiring and plumbing are up to code. Fix loose hand railings on staircases. Eliminate mold, lead and asbestos, as these contaminants can make a person seriously sick.

It is in your – and your tenants’ – best interests that you conduct a safety inspection with the help of a professional in the industry. This will help you address any potential problems that can arise, so that you may rectify them quickly.

Follow the Lease

This sounds obvious, but the conditions of the lease apply to both the tenants and the landlord of a property.  Make sure that the lease has been read thoroughly by both tenant and landlord, to minimize the risk of miscommunication leading to potential litigation. Leases are legally binding contracts that outline the terms and responsibilities of both parties. Failing to abide by the terms, or by inputting terms that are against the law, can land a landlord in a courtroom.

Get the Help of Residential Property Management Pros to Stay Out of Legal Trouble

Unfortunately, there is no way to 100% safeguard yourself, as a landlord, against the possibility of being sued by a tenant. But if you adhere to the terms of your lease and address concerns within the environment in a timely fashion, you’re going to have an easier time renting out your property. Contact the residential property management experts at MYND to learn more about how to uphold your end of the deal as a landlord.